Pisu, Pels & Bottini: Improving Infrastructure in the United Kingdom

Abstract:

The United Kingdom (UK) has spent less on infrastructure compared to other OECD countries over the past three decades. The perceived quality of UK infrastructure assets is close to the OECD average but lower than in other G7 countries. Capacity constraints have emerged in some sectors, such as electricity generation, air transport and roads. Developing and regularly updating a national infrastructure strategy, with the National Infrastructure Plan being a welcome first step in this direction, would contribute to reduce policy uncertainty and tackle capacity constraints in a durable way. The design of coherent development plans by local authorities congruent with the national and local planning systems should continue to improve project delivery. The government intends to finance a large share of infrastructure spending to 2020 and beyond through private capital. Unlocking private investment in a cost effective and transparent way could be supported by further improving incentives for greenfield investment, continuing to carefully assess and record public-private partnerships, and promoting more long-term financing instruments. This Working Paper relates to the 2015 OECD Economic Survey of the United Kingdom (www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/economic-survey-united-kingdom.htm).

Available for download here.

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Sengupta, Mukherjee & Gupta: Financing for Infrastructure Investment in G-20 Countries

ABSTRACT:

This study looks into various sources of financing infrastructure and the demands for infrastructure investments and highlights the mismatch between demand and supply of funds for infrastructure financing in India. In order to address this mismatch, and given the constraints of traditional sources of infrastructure finance in India, this paper suggests credit enhancement scheme (CES) as an alternative framework for mobilizing long-term infrastructure finance. It suggests for scaling up CES as one of the options for leveraging global finance for long-term investment in infrastructure projects. The suggested scheme of credit enhancement could be scaled up at the G-20 level for mobilizing finance from sources which were earlier shying away from investing in infrastructure projects (e.g., pension and insurance fund). This study also suggests a possible structure for operationalizing this scheme at the G-20 level. The proposed scheme is not specific to G-20 countries, but could be used by other countries (including developing countries which have low sovereign ratings) to leverage long term finance for infrastructure sector.

 

Available for download here.

Costa & Hoyer: Why Invest in Urban Landscapes? Impacts of European Research on Paradigm Shift in Urban Planning

ABSTRACT:

In recent years, the European Union encouraged plenty of research on the development of innovative solutions, strategies, and networks to develop sustainable cities. In this paper, we present and discuss the outcomes and perspectives of four European projects (URGE, GreenKeys, SWITCH, and CyberParks) and their contributions to bridge the gap between knowledge, policymaking, and citizens. While URGE, GreenKeys, and SWITCH are already completed, CyberParks is in its initial steps. The projects URGE and GreenKeys focus on green landscapes. In URGE, a set of criteria was created to assess urban green spaces, and thus increase their potential for improving the quality of life in cities. GreenKeys addressed the creation and adoption of green space strategies as a shared vision towards more inclusive urban spaces. SWITCH focused on blue landscapes, it aimed to advance and adopt integrated urban water management by connecting urban water and urban green issues. Finally, CyberParks is focusing on urban landscapes in a digital era. It aims to foster greater knowledge about the relationship between new information, communication technologies, and public spaces. Having projects with different time lag allows us to better understand the impacts on urban planning practices resulting from these projects, and show the needs for ongoing research agendas.

 

Available for download here.

Mutamba & Busari: Strategic Coordination for Sustainable Investment in Critical Infrastructure

ABSTRACT:

In demonstrating the prime place of infrastructure investment in its national long-term development framework encapsulated in Vision 2030, as well as in the related New Growth Path, South Africa recently put together a comprehensive National Infrastructure Plan. Aside from mapping out short and medium-term priorities for scaling up investment in strategic sectors and enhancing infrastructure links across the country, the initiative underscores development objectives such as community empowerment and skills development. This paper zeroes into one of the 18 strategic programs in the plan—specifically devoted to water and sanitation infrastructure—and presents the principal elements for pursuing effective inter-project coordination and integration, as well as,
ultimately, for ensuring the sustainable implementation of critical infrastructure. The approaches that have influenced the success of strategic coordination include participatory planning, project prioritization, regular tracking and unblocking of implementation hurdles, localization, active stakeholder engagement and ongoing program integration.

 

Available for download here.

Gay & Sinha: Water Infrastructure Asset Primer

ABSTRACT:

Water infrastructure systems are essential for sustaining societal quality of life. However, they face a variety of challenges and potential threats to sustained performance, including aging, deterioration, underfunding, disruptive events, and population growth, among others. Infrastructure asset management can contribute significantly to address those challenges and sustain system performance in the long term. Current infrastructure asset management frameworks focus mostly on performance management, and although sustainability and resiliency management are considered at some degree, it is necessary to advance the understanding and integration of more practical and comprehensive sustainability and resiliency enhancing methods and tools into mainstream asset management practice. Furthermore, the integration of infrastructure sustainability and resilience methodologies with asset management is convenient given the increase in risks to infrastructure performance worldwide.

This primer presents an integrated understanding of water infrastructure management in terms of performance management, sustainability management, and resiliency management. It also presents a discussion on the state-of-the-literature and the state-of-the-practice on these three infrastructure management topics as observed by the WATERiD research team while developing the national knowledge database. Finally, this primer compares both the theoretical and practical domains to identify gaps and formulate recommendations for improving holistic water infrastructure asset management.

Available for download here.

Halland et al.: Resource Financed Infrastructure

From the Overview:

This report, consisting of a study prepared by global project finance specialists Hunton & Williams LLP and comments from six internationally reputed economists and policy makers, provides an analytical discussion of resource financed infrastructure (RFI) contracting from a project finance perspective. The report is meant as a forum for in-depth discussion and as a basis for further research into RFI’s role, risks, and potential,  without any intention to present a World Bank supported view on RFI contracting. It is motivated by the conviction that if countries are to continue to either seek RFI or receive unsolicited RFI proposals, there is an onus on public officials to discern bad deals from good, to judge unavoidable trade-offs, and to act accordingly. The report aims to provide a basis for developing insights on how RFI deals can be made subject to the same degree of public policy scrutiny as any other instrument through which a government of a low- or lower-middle-income country might seek to mobilize development finance.

Available for download here.